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'When does this end?': Sisters of Atatiana Jefferson speak out after grand jury decision in the death of Breonna Taylor

October 12 will mark one year since Atatiana Jefferson was killed.

FORT WORTH, Texas — On streets across the country Wednesday night, protesters are marching and chanting the name: Breonna Taylor.

Earlier in the day, a Louisville grand jury indicted one officer involved in the March raid that killed Taylor.

The officer, Brett Hankison, faces three counts of wanton endangerment, a D-level felony with a punishment up to five years. No officers were directly charged for Taylor’s death.

RELATED: Grand jury indicts Brett Hankison in Breonna Taylor case, but no charges in her death

The low-level charge sparked nationwide protests.

“This is a tragedy. And sometimes the law, criminal law, is not adequate to respond to a tragedy and I acknowledge that,” said Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron during a press conference Wednesday.

Ashley Carr has heard the name of her sister, Atatiana Jefferson, chanted as part of racial equality protests, too.

“It makes you speechless to understand that the list is still going and going and going,” Carr said. “We never got a chance to grieve. It’s just like it’s so much.”

October 12 will mark a year since Jefferson was killed by former Fort Worth police officer Aaron Dean.

Her other sister, Amber Carr, says the past year has been a struggle.

“I really can’t call her. I really can’t just pop up at her house,” she said. “Right now, in my world nothing makes sense.”

“It’s sad that so many people have lost their lives and change still hasn’t been made,” said Ashley Carr.

The sisters have formed a close bond with others who have lost loved ones to police including Botham Jean’s sister.

RELATED: Sisters of Atatiana Jefferson, Botham Jean, and Sandra Bland launch national movement to fight police brutality

"Every day you have your good days; you have your bad days,” said Amber.

On days like Wednesday, they talk to share grief and support.

“We all just want justice for our loved ones,” Ashley said. “We all just want real change to happen so that no one else can join this group.”

Ashley and Amber Carr support the protests but say the chants around the country will go unheard unless people vote, too.

“We can protest all day but if people are in positions that are not agreeing with the protest, they’re not going to listen to us,” Ashley said. “They’re not going to work with the people.”

The sisters want change to shorten list of those losing loved ones and waiting on justice.

“When does this end?,” Ashley Carr said. “When can you feel safe?