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20 additional coronavirus deaths reported Friday in Dallas County, health officials say

The county has moved back to the highest coronavirus risk threat level. "It's not a time to return to our pre-COVID normal," Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said.

Updated at 6:44 p.m. with details of the latest coronavirus deaths. 

Dallas County health officials expect to announce 20 additional deaths from COVID-19 on Friday. 

Among the newly-reported deaths was a man in his 20s who was found dead inside his Carrollton home. 

The county was moved back to the highest coronavirus risk level this week, known as "stay safe, stay home." Daily new cases and coronavirus hospitalizations have been increasing across the North Texas region in recent weeks. 

"It's not a time to return to our pre-COVID normal," Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said Friday.

As part of the heightened risk level, county health officials recommend people avoid dining inside restaurants, going to movie theaters and to limit interactions with people outside the household. 

Jenkins said he fears some people have relaxed their precautions after state officials announced expanded reopenings of businesses and restaurants. Bars were allowed to reopen this week in some Texas counties, including in Tarrant County. 

RELATED: COVID-19 updates: Man who died at home among 20 additional deaths in Dallas County

But, Jenkins said, increases in new coronavirus cases means people should be acting more like they were in April when most businesses were closed. 

"Unfortunately, we're entering a period where we need to be more restrictive," the judge said. 

County officials urge people to continue wearing masks, maintaining 6 feet of distance from others and regularly washing their hands. 

Jenkins said people should avoid gathering inside homes, including foregoing barbecues, parties and baby showers. He also said that children should not trick-or-treat on Halloween. 

"We all feel the weight of COVID fatigue, but our fight is not over," the judge said. 

The Texas governor's office said state leaders are working with local officials to address spikes. A spokesperson for Gov. Greg Abbott said people should still wear masks and stay physically distant. 

"These best practices, coupled with the Governor’s metrics to monitor COVID-19 hospitalizations, are key to mitigating this virus and keeping our communities and our people safe," said the governor's spokesperson, Nan Tolson, in a written statement. 

Dallas County officials are not closing any businesses but are reminding people what is safe, Jenkins said. Many businesses are allowed to legal reopen or expand occupancy. 

"Don't focus on what is legal. Focus on what is safe," the judge said Friday. 

After declines in the number of daily cases in August, county officials decreased the coronavirus risk threat level to "extreme caution." 

But daily new cases have been steadily increasing in recent weeks. Health officials have reported more than 300 new COVID-19 cases each day in Dallas County for the past week. 

On Oct. 9 in the North Texas region, 6.4% of hospitalizations were COVID-19 patients. As of Wednesday, that percentage increased to just over 8%, according to statewide health data. 

The latest coronavirus-related deaths include: 

  • A Carrollton man in his 20s who was found dead in his home. He had underlying high-risk conditions
  • An Irving man in his 40s who died in an emergency room and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Grand Prairie man in his 40s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas man in his 50s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He did not have underlying health conditions.
  • A Mesquite man in his 60s who died in an emergency room and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas woman in her 70s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Seagoville man in his 60s.
  • A Dallas man in his 70s who did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas man in his 70s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas woman in her 70s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A DeSoto woman in her 70s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas woman in her 70s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas man in his 70s. He died at the long-term care facility where he lived. 
  • A Dallas man in his 70s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas man in his 80s who had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas man in his 80s. He had lived at a long-term care facility. 
  • A Rowlett man in his 80s who didn't have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Dallas woman in her 80s. She had been a resident of a long-term care facility. 
  • An Irving man in his 80s who didn't have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A Garland man in his 90s who didn't have underlying high-risk health conditions.