DALLAS — An urban farm that’s dedicated to addressing food access challenges and food insecurities is getting help with its mission from a new community partner.

Bonton Farms is receiving a donation from Kroger. The grocery company and its associates presented the team from Bonton Farms with a check for $70,000 during a special volunteer event at the farm’s South Dallas operation.

“This has been a day in the making,” said April Martin, Public Affairs Director of Kroger – Dallas Division.

Partnerships and people are powerful. A large group of Kroger associates spent time volunteering at the farm as part of the grocer’s ‘Zero Hunger – Zero Waste’ initiative.

Bonton Farms’ Founder and CEO Daron Babcock explained, "Food is a really important part of being a human being. Without it, we suffer. Our lives becomes something smaller."

The donation from Kroger will allow Bonton Farms in its efforts to expand food production and services. Martin says the company has been intentional in expanding its reach in Southern Dallas.

“We’re trying our best to expand partnerships for greater customer value,” Martin explained.

A few weeks ago, Dallas City Council members approved incentives to allow Kroger and its partner Ocado to open a large robotics based online grocery distribution center at the corner of Telephone and Bonnie View roads in Southern Dallas. That site is bringing about 400 jobs to the area.

RELATED: Council approves $5.7 million in incentives to bring Kroger online grocery warehouse to Dallas

"It’s this innovative technology fulfillment center which is going to expand our footprint and give accessibility to food to more and more people in the state of Texas," Martin said. 

The team at Bonton Farms says the donation will also help as it continues providing fresh food options and jobs at the on-site market and café. A coffee house is opening next week. There are also plans in the works for a daily farmers market.

Babcock said, "My dream has always been to do something here that works, so that we can empower and give hope to communities that don’t have it."

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