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Dallas activist Dominique Alexander arrested on domestic violence charges

Alexander called his arrest an "unfortunate situation" as he was escorted into the jail downtown.

DALLAS — Dallas activist Dominique Alexander has been arrested on a felony assault charge in a domestic violence case involving his girlfriend, according to court records.

Alexander was taken into custody and taken to the Dallas County Jail on Thursday afternoon. Alexander called his arrest an "unfortunate situation" as he was escorted into the jail downtown.

Credit: Dallas County Jail
Dominique Alexander

Alexander faces charges of assault causing serious bodily injury and a misdemeanor assault in the case, according to the warrant in the case.

WFAA first reported the incident Wednesday morning after multiple sources confirmed his girlfriend showed up at the Northwest Patrol Division with injuries and filed a complaint.

RELATED: Activist Dominique Alexander under investigation for domestic violence

Activist Jeff Hood told WFAA he met Alexander’s girlfriend at the hospital and then drove with her to the police department to make the report.

"She’s hurt, she’s scared, she’s in a lot of pain," Hood said. "In this situation, it was very clear that something had happened."

The Dallas Police Department on Wednesday confirmed it received a report of family violence.

“An individual arrived at the Northwest Patrol Division and reported an allegation involving a Dominique Alexander. The Dallas Police Department family violence unit is currently investigating the allegation.”

Alexander did not respond to request for comment, but instead took to Facebook Live, where in a 17-minute video, he described the situation as "an exploitation of my privacy and my family."

Alexander has routinely met with Dallas City leaders, including City Manager T.C. Broadnax, who put him on a committee that gave him advice on hiring Chief Renee Hall.

Hall has also met with Alexander on a regular basis and sought his advice changes to the Citizens Police Review Board. The Dallas City Council is expected to vote on the newly branded Community Police Oversight Board on April 24. 

Alexander was convicted of shaking a 2-year-old baby in 2011. He was sentenced to five years but released on probation shortly after his sentencing.

Alexander has also been convicted of theft, making a false report and evading arrest. He's also currently under indictment in Denton County for felony theft.

Alexander is most well known as being part of a large group that helped organize a protest in downtown Dallas – after the death of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile in Minnesota by police in the summer of 2016.

Five Dallas officers were killed at the end of the protest on July 7 by a gunman unrelated to the protest.

Since then, Alexander has remained active protesting high-profile by police shootings, including against former DPD officer Amber Guyger in September 2018.

Hood says the movement against police brutality is bigger than one person - and said Alexander, who he still counts as a friend, seeks help.

"He obviously has anger issues that he needs to get help with," Hood said.

On Friday, Dallas County District Attorney John Creuzot said he will recuse his office from the case due to a conflict of interest. Alexander campaigned for Creuzot when he ran for office. A judge will have to appoint a special prosecutor. 

Attorney Lee Merritt posted on Facebook Thursday night that he supports the victim in the case. He writes that Alexander "does not embody the fight for civil rights in Dallas and the movement will continue in full stride without him."

"I have now had an opportunity to speak briefly with Alexander’s victim and offer her my unabashed support. There can be no excuse for what she was forced to endure. It is as disappointing as it is intolerable that her assailant holds himself out as a leader for justice. Dominique Alexander does not embody the fight for civil rights in Dallas and the movement will continue in full stride without him. The aspect of the victim’s statement that I find most troubling is the idea that Alexander believed he could escape accountability by virtue of his role as an activist. I have said before the system generally doesn’t need any help prosecuting black men— however, I will take whatever steps necessary to ensure the cause of justice in this case is not interfered with by Alexander’s position or influence."