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Texas is now offering up to $5,000 hiring bonuses for these healthcare jobs

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission on Monday announced it will offer up to $5,000 in hiring bonuses for certain positions at state healthcare facilities.

DALLAS — Texas is offering new incentives for people who get hired at state-run hospitals and living centers.

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission announced on Monday that it will offer hiring bonuses of up to $5,000 for certain positions at state healthcare facilities.

The maximum bonuses will be for registered nurses, who can qualify for up to $5,000. Meanwhile, licensed vocational nurses can qualify for up to $3,500 in bonuses, and direct support professionals and psychiatric nursing assistants can receive up to $2,500.

Applicants can view all open positions here.

The state is hoping the bonuses can help "recruit qualified, motivated health care professionals to help support residents" at state-run living center and hospitals, said Scott Schalchlin, deputy executive commissioner of the state health commission.

"Many people right now are looking for a new career or taking that next step in their current career," Schalchlin said in a news release. "We have some great opportunities for people who are interested in working in an environment where they can make a true difference in the lives of others every single day."

State healthcare positions are currently open across the state in such cities as Abilene, Austin, Denton, San Antonio, Wichita Falls, Terrell and Lubbock.

State-run living centers provide support for people who have intellectual or developmental disabilities. State-run hospitals provide inpatient psychiatric care for adults and children.

While it's not clear if state-run facilities have been hit by staffing shortages specifically resulting from the pandemic, the issue has been a problem across the country over since the COVID-19 outbreak began.

In September, health leaders reported a nurse staffing crisis, pointing to pandemic burnout and traveling-nurse positions that offer more lucrative pay as likely culprits.