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Before/after photos show shocking flooding in Houston, D.C., other cities if global temperature warms more than 3°C

Climate Research, an independent organization, researched the impact of sea level rise if emissions lead to a 3°C warming. Use the slider to view comparisons.

DALLAS — World leaders are in Scotland for a United Nations climate summit. Their mission is to limit the future threats of climate change. One of biggest threats to Texas is sea level rise. So, how bad is the problem? David Schechter will explain tonight on WFAA News at 10.

Diplomats and heads of state are in Glasgow, Scotland for the highly-anticipated COP26 climate summit.

The conference hopes to get countries' commitments to accelerate action on climate change and to dramatically cut their carbon emissions and curb the warming of the planet to a limit of 1.5°C. After that benchmark, scientists predict it will be too late to reverse the most serious effects of warming.

RELATED: Climate change, extreme weather reshaped our planet this year

Climate and energy choices now will also influence how high sea levels rise due to global warming. Climate Central, an independent organization of scientists and journalists, researched the impact of sea level rise.

In this interactive, you can explore the impact of sea level rise in five cities based on Climate Central's research of what could happen in extreme high emissions scenarios leading, to 3°C warming around the world.

Move the slider to compare satellite imagery of potential impacts.

Space Center Houston - Houston, Texas

Texas Energy Museum - Beaumont, Texas

Lincoln Memorial - Washington, D.C. 

Downtown Honolulu - Honolulu, Hawaii

Santa Monica Pier - Santa Monica, California