A Parker County pet rescue non-profit says it is unsure if it will continue after it's creator drowned over the weekend in Lewisville Lake.

Suzanne Floyd, 64, was swimming in the lake about 200 feet from a boat when she went under and was unresponsive when she surfaced, according to the Denton County game warden.

Floyd founded Salty Dogs Rescue in 2012 in Weatherford as a place to care for unwanted and neglected animals, many of them pit bulls, and help find them forever homes.

Suzanne Floyd, 64, drowned in Lewisville Lake on Saturday June 30, 2018.  She created and operated Salty Dogs Rescue in Weatherford for neglected and abused animals.  The future on the non-profit is now uncertain.
Suzanne Floyd, 64, drowned in Lewisville Lake on Saturday June 30, 2018. She created and operated Salty Dogs Rescue in Weatherford for neglected and abused animals. The future on the non-profit is now uncertain.

On Tuesday, staff at the sprawling operation south of Weatherford said they are doing everything possible to ready as many of the dogs for adoption, even while not knowing what future the 501c-3 non-profit may have.

Tiffany Love started at Salty Dogs Rescue in February and said Floyd was immediately both a leader and mentor.

"She was someone who had a lot of compassion for what she did ," Love said. "Now what? She was the matriarch here, she held it all together. Without her we just kind of sit here in limbo."

Suzanne Floyd, 64, drowned in Lewisville Lake on Saturday June 30, 2018.  She created and operated Salty Dogs Rescue in Weatherford for neglected and abused animals.  The future on the non-profit is now uncertain.
Suzanne Floyd, 64, drowned in Lewisville Lake on Saturday June 30, 2018. She created and operated Salty Dogs Rescue in Weatherford for neglected and abused animals. The future on the non-profit is now uncertain.

Floyd's niece Jessica Messman is the president of the non-profit. Messman started a fundraising effort and said all the proceeds are going for food and supplies to the more than 30 dogs at the rescue.

Love said about half of the dogs at the rescue are eligible for adoption and that remains their goal over the next few weeks, while the long term future of the non-profit is far less certain.

If you're interested in help finding these dogs a forever home, you're encouraged to get in touch directly via it's website or Facebook page.