Eight Americans are among the 157 dead in an Ethiopian Airlines crash that left no survivors Sunday. The model of plane that crashed, a Boeing 737 Max 8, was also the same model that crashed into the sea off Indonesia minutes after takeoff in 2018, killing 189 people.

Since the crash, the Boeing 737 Max 8 has become a linchpin of news coverage. 

Tuesday, the Federal Aviation Administration released a statement saying there was "no basis to order grounding the aircraft":

The FAA continues to review extensively all available data and aggregate safety performance from operators and pilots of the Boeing 737 MAX.  Thus far, our review shows no systemic performance issues and provides no basis to order grounding the aircraft.  Nor have other civil aviation authorities provided data to us that would warrant action.  In the course of our urgent review of data on the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash, if any issues affecting the continued airworthiness of the aircraft are identified, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.  

Everyone from consumers to American airline companies to Sen. Ted Cruz has spoken out about the plane. 

Here's a roundup of everything you need to know to stay informed on this developing story:

Eight Americans among 157 dead in Ethiopian Airlines crash that left no survivors

More airlines, countries ground Boeing jet involved in Ethiopia crash

Southwest, American customers take to Twitter to question airlines’ use of Boeing 737 Max 8

VERIFY: Fact-checking claims made about the Boeing 737 Max 8

Ted Cruz calls for U.S. to 'temporarily ground 737 Max' aircraft following deadly crash

Pilots have reported issues in US with new Boeing jet