70 years ago, SMU"s Doak Walker won the Heisman Trophy.

In glorious black and white, "The Doaker" was a legend.

Now, he's in color.

"It's a beautiful thing that they're able to go back and re-do these pictures," 1987 Heisman winner Tim Brown said, "and really bring them to life."

The Doak '48 collection, colorized by Doug Murray, brings the Highland Park kid into the age of high definition.

"70 years later, they're doing something like this right here. That's special," 1982 Heisman winner Herschel Walker said. "That tells you the type of person he was."

The collection honors Doak, but it also honors photographer Brad Bradley, who took nearly all these photos.

"We opened up a studio on Hillcrest in 1947, and that was the year Doak came," Bradley explained.

And for the next couple years, Bradley and his studio captured some tremendous moments, on and off the field.

"Doak was a good looking brother," Brown said with a laugh. "I can tell you that, man."

"A lot of girls, and a lot of mothers wanted their daughters to date him."

That's Norma Walker -- Doak's first wife. She was featured in one of the photographs, waiting at the train station with Doak before he left for Pittsburgh to go play a game for the Mustangs.

"The train station was so close to SMU, we just sat their and waited for the train... it's amazing what they've done. It brings back a lot of memories."

There's even a picture of Doak, catching a pass over the middle against Texas in 1947. The Longhorns defender watching him make the grab? Cowboys legendary head coach Tom Landry, thirteen years before his Cowboys even existed.

"Your legacy goes on," Brown said. "And for this family tonight, they'll be able to look at this, and what he's done, in a totally different way."

"He thought he wasn't different from the rest of us," Bradley said, wistfully remembering a photographer subject who grew to be a legend. "But he really was."