FORT WORTH — A seven-foot wooden cross carved from a dying Cottonwood tree has folks on North Sylvania Avenue doing a double take.

"People honk, they stop and pull around," said Susan Rios. "It really is something to see."

It's actually Rios' neighbor, Gary Ayers, that's getting most of the inquiries.

The tree was in his front lawn.

Prayer tree in Fort Worth
Prayer tree in Fort Worth

"It's a rough texture, which is done because of the chainsaw," Ayers said. "... Ya' know, we're all being worked on this life."

A strong Christian, Ayers says it was actually some neighbors that suggested earlier this year he turn the dying tree into a piece of "art."

He settled on a cross, and called a friend to help whittle the massive stump into the cross.

He says a prayer request box is getting a lot of use, too.

Prayer tree in Fort Worth
Prayer tree in Fort Worth

"They're not alone and there is something to look forward to," he said. "I think the one that meant the most was a couple that were homeless and living in their vehicle, looking for work and struggling with addiction. That one touched me."

It just isn't strangers that have embraced the cross.

Rios says it's the talk of the Oakhurst neighborhood.

Prayer tree in Fort Worth
Prayer tree in Fort Worth

"I actually noticed it the same week by mother passed away," she said. "It was almost like a sign. It was a spiritual moment for me."

Ayers says he'll keep it up as long as the symbol keeps resonating with anyone and everyone.

"It really is about Jesus, and his sacrifice, and what that can mean today," he said.