DALLAS — Overall value and favorable personal tax policies are the primary drivers behind a millennial invasion in Dallas and across the state.

In the 2019 U.S. Cities Scorecard for Millennials, more than 3,000 members of the generation across 22 major metros ranked cities across more than 40 dimensions. 

Dallas did not rank No. 1 in any of the 40 categories, but consistently ranked in the top 10. 

In a separate ranking that represented an amalgamation of all 40 categories – entitled "Overall Value (Worth Living In)" – Dallas came in third behind Houston and Atlanta, ranking at Nos. 1 and 2 respectively. To see where these major metros ranked for overall value, click here

New York took the No. 1 spot in 14 categories, while Austin and Houston took the top ranking in eight and six categories respectively.

It's Dallas' consistency, rather than any singular standout feature, that earned the metro its top billing for the survey's "Overall Value" category. 

Scenic cities often came with higher price tags, which tempered overall results for cities like Portland and Seattle. While other cities that fared well on cultural verticals did not compete as well against Texas' tax policies. 

Dallas ranked highest when it came to costs, presence of well-established companies, schools, overall family environment, fair income taxes and overall taxes, according to the scorecard.

However, millennials found Dallas to be lacking when it came to ease of meeting new people, walkability, access to nature and overall physical environment. It was also a little less than middling for overall culture and access to universities.

You can see where Dallas ranked in all categories in the list below. The top-ranked overall city was included, as well, in addition to the top-ranked Texas city, if not Dallas:

  • Costs: #3 (Houston ranks #1)
  • Benefits: #12 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Salary potential: #4 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #3)
  • Fulfilling jobs: #6 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Jobs in your field: #9 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Presence of well-established companies: #3 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Overall satisfaction with career opportunities: #6 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Easy to meet people: #17 (New York ranks #1; Austin ranks #3)
  • Friendliness of people: #6 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Finding people like you: #14 (New York ranks #1; Austin ranks #3)
  • Crowds: #15 (Miami ranks #1; Houston ranks #3)
  • Overall social environment: #14 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Diversity: #11 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Access to theaters: #10 (New York ranks #1; Austin ranks #2)
  • Universities: #15 (Boston ranks #1; Austin ranks #5)
  • Restaurants: #10 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #4)
  • Sports: #8 (Boston ranks No. 1)
  • Overall culture: #15 (New York ranks #1; Austin ranks #2)
  • Schools: #3 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Family friendliness: #4 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Amenities for children: #6 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Overall family environment: #3 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Parks and green spaces: #12 (Portland ranks #1; Austin ranks #3)
  • Walkability: #21 (New York ranks #1; Austin ranks #10)
  • Aesthetics of the city and cleanliness: #5 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Climate: #11 (Los Angeles ranks #1; Austin ranks #10)
  • Access to nature: #20 (Denver ranks #1; Austin ranks #6)
  • Overall physical environment: #18 (Austin ranks #1)
  • Commute times: #6 (Minneapolis ranks #1)
  • Public transport: #11 (New York ranks #1; Houston ranks #6)
  • Traffic: #5 (Minneapolis ranks #1)
  • Fair property taxes: #5 (Phoenix ranks #1; Houston ranks #3)
  • Fair income taxes: #2 (Houston ranks #1)
  • Fair sales taxes: #6 (Portland ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Other tax: #6 (Miami ranks #1; Austin ranks #2)
  • Overall taxes: #3 (Miami ranks #1; Houston ranks #2)
  • Housing costs: #5 (Houston ranks #1)
  • Cost of everyday living: #5 (Houston ranks #1)
  • Health care cost: #4 (Houston ranks #1)
  • Overall cost of living: #5 (Houston ranks #1)

The Langston Co. performed the survey in partnership with Centiment.co. The study employed Langston's PRISM methodology, which utilizes both qualitative and quantitative information to push into perceived value and behaviors beyond macroeconomic indicators.

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