Booking flights can be stressful enough, but it can be even more unpleasant when you’re spending that hour layover in one of the worst airports in America.

A study done by Upgraded Points took a comprehensive look at 60 airports to determine the 10 best and worst airports in the nation. In their calculations they considered overall satisfaction, timeliness of flights, ease of access to the city center and airports amenities.

Here are the results for the 10 best airports:

  1. Portland International Airport (PDX)
  2. Denver International Airport (DEN)
  3. Tampa International Airport (TPA)
  4. Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)
  5. San Francisco International Airport (SFO)
  6. Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport (MSP)
  7. Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX)
  8. Sacramento International Airport (SMF)
  9. Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL)
  10. Indianapolis International Airport (IND)

It’s not a surprise that Portland International Airport tops the list as it’s been ranked by numerous publications as the best domestic airport many years in a row.

The airport is favored for their easy check-in and security, numerous dining options, access to public transportation and free wi-fi.

On the other hand, here are the results for the 10 worst airports:

  1. John Glenn Columbus International Airport (CMH)
  2. LaGuardia Airport (LGA)
  3. Eppley Airfield (OMA)
  4. Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)
  5. Buffalo Niagara International Airport (BUF)
  6. San Antonio International Airport (SAT)
  7. Bradley International Airport (BDL)
  8. Hollywood Burbank International Airport (BUR)
  9. Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY)
  10. Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL)

John Glenn Columbus International Airport ranked low as travelers were unsatisfied with the limited dining selections, security wait times, zero lounge access and consistent delays.

On a positive note, the study found that overall satisfaction at U.S. airports is at its highest level ever.