More than 6,000 people are expected at the Southwest Cannabis Conference and Expo this weekend when it takes over the downtown convention center.

Presenters include Montel Williams, former NFL stars, doctors, advocates, and veterans like Roger Martin.

"It's obviously a cutting edge thing, especially in Texas," said the US Army veteran, who a few years ago started the Colorado-based group Grow for Vets.

He says he plans to expand the non-profit's marijuana outreach efforts for veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder to Texas because so many military vets call the Lone Star state home.

"All that I care about is that veterans — the bravest among us — have safe access to safe medicine," he said in a Skype interview on Wednesday.

The event is expected to draw a wide-range of people interested in marijuana legalization.

Although Texas now permits limited medical marijuana use, some people say the state continues to lag behind others.

Alexis Bortell and her family moved from Texas to Colorado so her seizures could be treated with cannabis oil without breaking the law.
Alexis Bortell and her family moved from Texas to Colorado so her seizures could be treated with cannabis oil without breaking the law.

WFAA profiled Alexis Bortell last year, a young Texas girl forced to relocate with her family to Colorado after they couldn't legally use the cannabis oils needed to help control her epileptic seizures.

Bortell will be a featured speaker on day two of the Fort Worth conference.

The city said organizers are putting down about $16,000 to lease the facility.

While some onlookers may think conservative Fort Worth an unlikely spot to host an entire exhibit and conference centered around cannabis, Mayor Betsy Price said the exhibit is welcome.

"It's a public facility. Everybody has freedom of speech," Price said. "They have to follow all of our rules just like all the other conventions."

Organizer Rory Mendoza told WFAA earlier this month they were excited to come to Cowtown after looking at options elsewhere in the state. He said exhibit space for the Saturday and Sunday event was filling up quickly.

Late Wednesday, organizers issued a news release pointing out that presidential candidate Donald Trump would be speaking in the same space one day earlier, on Friday.

Mendoza said he hopes Trump touches on the issue of marijuana.

“As the GOP primaries are about to set Texas ablaze, America’s most controversial candidate will be surrounded by the cannabis community," Mendoza said. "A nod for legalization could be just what pushes Trump over the top."