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Meals on Wheels, VNA of Texas and local first responders team up to vaccinate those in need

The VNA of Texas told WFAA at least 30% of its clients are vaccinated, while 30% are hesitating and 30% are left wondering how to get it.

DALLAS — In different parts of the country, like New York, fitness centers and other locations are starting to ask for proof of a vaccination card. Here in the Dallas area, there are still thousands and thousands of people that are still not vaccinated, and they don’t know how to go about getting a shot.

Patricia lives in West Dallas, and she said she depends on her meals from Meals on Wheels every day.

“I love when they have the little snacks in the bag because I love sweets,” Patricia said.

But with her diabetes and underlying health conditions, the 57-year-old knows how to take care of her body.

“I’ve had two brain surgeries, four tumors and two strokes. It’s been kind of a tough go,” Patricia said.

And, she said she made sure to get vaccinated because the Delta variant has a bad reputation and no one knows what it will do next.

But getting out of the house is extremely difficult.

“I’m home-bound,” Patricia said.

On Tuesday, Meals on Wheels, the Visiting Nurse Association of Texas and local first responders teamed up, and showed up at her doorstep, and got her vaccinated.

“I don’t want to be in the hospital, or the morgue. Don’t let your last trip be either one of them,” Patricia said.

Patricia’s message to others who are in the same shoes as her is to read the flyers that Meals on Wheels are now handing out about getting vaccinated.

“It’s really hard for these folks to get out. So [we] knock on the door, deliver the vaccine to them so they don’t have to leave their homes,” said Chris Culak from the VNA of Texas.

The VNA of Texas told WFAA at least 30% of its clients are vaccinated, while 30% are hesitating and 30% are left wondering how to get it. The other 10% are still left wanting to get educated about it.

Drivers with the VNA said a common story they hear is that someone doesn't want to get vaccinated but then will hear about a loved one who got sick, and that’s when they want to get vaccinated. 

“They know people that are sick, and it's, here is their opportunity to protect themselves, community, and family,” Culak said.

And, in bold, you can even request a vaccine by calling 214-689-0002.

“[COVID] has no respect to a person, so it doesn’t matter if you’re rich, poor, Black, white,” Patricia said.