Updated at 4:20 p.m. to note the boil notice had been lifted.

A "boil water notice" was lifted late Friday afternoon for a section of Denton, according to city officials.

City officials said there was an "unauthorized cross-connection" between a stormwater pond and a water distribution system Thursday at the University of North Texas. 

The area south of Interstate 35, west of Kendolph Drive, east of Western Boulevard and north of Highland Park Road had been affected, city officials said.

About 600 water customers had to boil their water. 

UNT staff notified the city about the issue Thursday afternoon. Around 4 p.m., city staff shut off distribution valves to contain the affected water. Officials will test the water for at least 24 hours before service is restored.

City officials said residents in the affected area should boil their water for two minutes before using it. This should be done for drinking water, brushing teeth, washing dishes or preparing food with water. 

Officials shared the following tips:

Why does Denton issue boil water notices? As a precaution when contamination within the water system is suspected, Denton Water Utilities can request that customers boil their water or use bottled water until water sample lab test results become available.

What is a boil water notice? A boil water notice is a public statement advising people to boil their tap water before using it, typically in response to an event that has (or could have) introduced contaminants into the water distribution system. Such events include a large water main break, widespread loss of system pressure, or results of routine sample testing in the system. Although waterborne diseases are extremely rare, they can be serious. The risk is higher for infants, the elderly and persons with immune deficiency disorders. Denton Water Utilities issues boil-water notices even if the possibility of contamination is remote to safeguard the health of the community. 

What do I need to do to make sure my water is safe to drink and use? You should boil tap water vigorously for at least two minutes prior to using it for drinking or cooking (the minute starts when the water begins to bubble). This includes water used for brushing teeth, making ice, washing raw foods, preparation of drinks and water for pets. Wait for the water to cool before using it or store it in the refrigerator in a clean container. Boiling 3 removes harmful bacteria in the water that may cause illness. You should throw away ice made during the time the advisory or notice was issued, as freezing does not kill bacteria.

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