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Children and companies get creative to celebrate Mother's Day during pandemic

"Right now, deliveries are the name of the game," Alto Chief Customer Officer Alex Halbardier says.

The usual Mother’s Day traditions may not be possible in the midst of a pandemic, but that just means sons and daughters have a chance to get creative in their celebrations.

And there are plenty of businesses pivoting to help send mom love from a social distance.

“Right now, deliveries are the name of the game,” said Alto Chief Customer Officer Alex Halbardier.

The rideshare company has used its fleet in a variety of ways during the pandemic and are now offering deliveries of flower bouquets or other curated gifts from their online market for Mother’s Day.

“Flowers are the number one seller. Everyone wants to give mom flowers and make her smile on Sunday, whether she gets to be with her family or separated.”

RELATED: Mother's Day brings decisions for families debating if they visit together or not

Other businesses are finding opportunities during the pandemic to create new ideas and partnerships. 

Deep Ellum based Petal Pushers and Reddy Vineyards are delivering two popular gifts moms love receiving; wines paired with the right compliment of flowers.

“It is a great way to spoil mom,” said Eric Sigmund with Reddy Vineyards. “It is a great way to brighten your Mother’s Day and support local business.”

RELATED: #UpWithHer: Gardenuity owner connecting people through plants

Another popular present known to make mom smile is jewelry, and Kendra Scott is giving personal styling tips while you shop without ever leaving home. 

You can book a 20-minute Zoom consultation on Mother’s Day for you and your mom to browse the store and find the perfect earrings, necklace, or whatever you are looking for with the help of an in-store employee.

“It has been so much fun and it has been people from all over the country,” said Angela Lozzi, an employee at a Dallas location. “We kind of hold (the jewelry) up and try to show them how it would look.”

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