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Controversial Dallas high-rise gets city council approval

The project generated dozens of formal letters of opposition.
Credit: Jake Dean / Dallas Business Journal
The Dallas City Council approved a contentious rezoning clearing the way for a large high-rise apartment building overlooking the Katy Trail.

DALLAS — The Dallas City Council approved a contentious rezoning clearing the way for a large high-rise apartment building overlooking the Katy Trail.

Oak Lawn residents and people who work or own businesses in the area fought the development proposed by Lincoln Property Co., citing concerns about the project’s height, density, the traffic it’s expected to generate, removal of mature trees, and the removal of existing affordable housing units from the increasingly expensive neighborhood, among other perceived drawbacks.

Specific opposition came from the Dallas Homeowners League, the Turtle Creek Neighborhood Association, and other homeowners associations and neighborhood groups. The project generated dozens of formal letters of opposition.

Despite its detractors, the high-rise, called Lincoln Katy Trail, had the blessing of the Dallas Plan Commission and received City Council approval Wednesday. It passed with only two council members — Omar Narvaez and Adam Bazaldua — voting against it.

The development site is along the northwest side of Carlisle Street, between Hall Street and Bowen Street.

RELATED: Rezoning rejected for seven-story apartment project near White Rock Lake

Before the vote, Paul Ridley, a former Dallas planning commissioner who is running for City Council in District 14, said the re-zoning should be rejected because it doesn’t meet the standards laid out in the 30-year-old Oak Lawn Plan, a document that spells out how the neighborhood should be developed.

He said approving the zoning would set a bad precedent.

“If this property is given a higher density zoning, it will lead like a row of dominos falling all up Carlisle Street with other properties that are subject to be redeveloped with even higher densities,” he said. “I think that would be terribly undesirable. It would completely change the nature of this neighborhood.”

To read more about this project, click here. 

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