For the Momentous Institute in Dallas, Wednesday's introduction of tablets into their classrooms marks the end of a year of research.

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DALLAS -- For the Momentous Institute in Dallas, Wednesday's introduction of tablets into their classrooms marks the end of a year of research.

Nearly 300 tablets loaded with educational software will be handed out by week's end; a technological advancement made possible due to the schools partnership with AT&T.

"We're being very, very mindful to not use technology for technology's sake, we're really looking to use technology to further what we already know works," said Michelle Kinder, the executive director of the Momentous Institute.

Wednesday, classrooms full of four and five year olds got their first test drive of the new teaching tool.

"We know that the problem across the country is pretty significant, so everybody is looking at how do we take what works in a small setting, like a lab school, and scale it out beyond our walls," Kinder said.

First-grade-teacher-turned-app-developer Matt McDonnell is behind the specially-developed software, called Famigo.

He is working to succeed where other districts across the country have failed.

"We're going to measure student learning outcomes and we're going to measure what they are using on the tablet, so that we can, over time, deliver better content to the students," McDonnell said.

AT&T donated nearly 300 educational tablet computers to students at Dallas' Momentous Institute. WFAA

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