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Some Texas lawmakers say it may be time to scratch out the lottery.

More than two decades after Texas voters legalized the game of chance in the state, a group of lawmakers will soon start reviewing whether to end a multibillion-dollar industry that pumps more than $1 billion a year into schools.

Critics say they fear that the game financially hurts some of the most vulnerable Texans and doesn't do enough to help the state. Supporters disagree and question where $1 billion a year can be found to replace revenue lost if the entrenched business is shut down.

Some 'believe the lottery was a trick and the state of Texas was sold a bag of goods that hasn't delivered,' said Rob Kohler, a consultant with the Dallas-based Christian Life Commission of the Baptist General Convention of Texas, which opposes gambling.

'It's gobbling up folks' money that they could otherwise use to buy food, pay health insurance or send their kids to camp.'

Gary Grief, executive director of the Texas Lottery Commission, said he looks forward to the legislative review.

'I'm hopeful that the work we've done here at the agency will be recognized ... and that they decide to keep us in business,' he said.

At the same time, he said he realizes this that it won't be review of the agency's efficiency.

'It's more a philosophical [review] of whether it's ... good to have a state-operated gaming program,' Grief said.

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