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ROUND ROCK -- The punishment a Round Rock man is facing for allegedly making cookies and brownies laced with marijuana and hash oil is generating national media attention.

Jacob Lavoro, 19, faces between five and 99 years in prison.

With his father and attorney by his side, he opened up to WFAA's sister station KVUE about the charges.

'It's really frightening, it really is. It's putting me in a really scary situation and honestly, I can't stop crying about it,' Lavoro said.

On April 14, a neighbor called police to the Colonial Village Apartments, located near the intersection of West Palmer Lane and McNeil Drive.

'I was just smelling smoke,' the woman, who does not want to be identified, said. She's five months pregnant and says the smell made her sick.

'The entire bathroom just reeked of smoke,' the woman said. 'I'm a person of a fitness background and first time mother, so I'm just ensuring that I'm doing everything in my capability to protect the health of my child.

Round Rock Police Commander Alain Babin explained what happened when an officer knocked on Lavoro's door.

'The officer told them why he was there, received consent to enter the residence, received consent to search the residence and located drug paraphernalia and some hash oil as well as some brownies and cookies that were packaged up for sale,' Babin said.

Lavoro says that's not the case.

'No I did not give consent. No way, shape or form did I give consent,' Lavoro said.

Still, officers confiscated drugs -- more than $1,600 -- and an apparent client list. They charged Lavoro with felony possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver.

'He was selling his product at $25 a brownie. He was making money off of illicit drugs. This is not some high school kid who was making brownies for personal consumption,' Babin added.

The charges, and possible punishment, are so severe because officers measured the brownies as well as the drugs themselves.

'When you mix items with a drug and it doesn't change its chemical compound, then you weigh the total amount of all the adulterants and diluent,' Babin said.

Lavoro's attorney says that's not exactly how the law works.

'What the law intended was that, say for example a drug dealer buys an amount -- an ounce of cocaine say -- well they'll take that ounce of cocaine and use baking soda to cut it to increase the amount of product and they make three or four times what they paid for it. That would be an adulterant or a diluent,' Jack Holmes said.

Holmes believes it was unfair for officers to measure the brownies, which increased the weight of the drugs to roughly 1.5 pounds -- as well as measuring the containers that kept the hash oil.

Arguments that will now have to be settled in court. Lavoro is scheduled to make his next appearance in June.

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