Fantasy Football: Where to go on the waiver wire in Week 9

Fantasy Football: Where to go on the waiver wire in Week 9

Credit: Getty Images

CINCINNATI, OH - OCTOBER 27: Marvin Jones #82 of the Cincinnati Bengals runs with the ball during the NFL game against the New York Jets at Paul Brown Stadium on October 27, 2013 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

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by JOSH DAVIS

WFAA Sports

Posted on October 29, 2013 at 3:40 PM

Updated Tuesday, Oct 29 at 3:40 PM

With Halloween upon us, we're suddenly heading into the home stretch of the fantasy season and it's time to pull out all the stops (if you're on the edge of contention) or protect yourself from a season-ruining injury (if you're likely in the playoff mix).

The regular season ends after Week 13 in most leagues, so if you're within a game or so of .500 at this point and near the edge of the playoffs, package your best bench player with a starter and try to improve one of your starting spots with someone dependable for the rest of the year.

Beyond that, the moves you should be making aren't quite as sexy as in weeks past as the variables decrease.

The NFL trade deadline is today, so we'll know if Tony Gonzalez or Kenny Britt are going to be worth a bit more down the stretch. Plus after this week, bye weeks will be winding down and the waiver pool competition will calm down a little bit.

You'll want to start filling out your roster with trustworthy backups in case of injury and dropping players that you may have been hoping would turn it around off your bench. Have a solid backup for every position, and fill out any roster space you may have left with a handcuff running back for an entrenched starter or an injured player due back before the year's out.

There aren't a ton of great options this week, so if you need some still-relevant picks that may be available, check out the Week 8 picks.

(For our purposes, we'll be categorizing players each week as should be added, could be added, or if you're desperate. The number of players we take a look at will vary each week depending on injuries and their realistic usefulness in the weeks to come -- no adding players for the sake of meeting a minimum.)

Should be added


Marvin Jones, WR, Cincinnati Bengals

The Bengals' depth chart will still tell you Mohamed Sanu is the No. 2 receiver in Cincinnati, but Jones now has as many or more targets in three straight games and has done a helluva lot more with them than Sanu has. That's now six touchdowns for Jones in the last three games, which I honestly see as more of a negative than a positive, because that number is going to fall back down to earth soon. But he's also broken 100 total yards in two-of-the-last-three games, which makes him add-worthy either way. Jones is a high-ceiling add who is worthy of Flex consideration now, and might be more than that going forward if he proves consistent or A.J. Green gets hurt.

Shane Vereen, RB, New England Patriots


If he's available, he may be your best chance at adding a starting running back for the final stretch and the playoffs, barring a major injury. He's out until Nov. 18 at the earliest, but would be more worthy of roster space than a middling receiver or a backup TE or QB brought in to cover a bye week. It remains to be seen how the Patriots' backfield mix will look upon his return, but in his one start this year, Vereen tore up the Bills for 101 yards on 14 carries plus 58 receiving yards on seven catches.

Andre Brown, RB, New York Giants

Another back nearing return from injury, I like Brown less than Vereen only because one, we haven't seen Brown play at all this year, and two, the Giants haven't shown an ability to run on anybody this season so the offensive line may be as big a problem as the backs. Brown is a sizable runner, so the values of Brandon Jacobs and Peyton Hillis both figure to take hits with his return in goalline situations. Brown will probably take over the majority of the workload until David Wilson returns, and once he does, there's no tell who (if any) of the Giants backs will have value.

Could be added

Kenny Stills, WR, New Orleans Saints

Stills has emerged as a deep threat for the Saints, though Drew Brees hasn't played favorites among his wideouts this year -- he spreads the ball around a lot and checks down frequently to backs out of the backfield and tight end/security blanket Jimmy Graham. The rookie receiver may be worth a stash while we wait to see if Brees continues to look for him, and considering New Orleans draws the Jets, Cowboys, and Falcons pass defenses in the next four weeks, Stills could be a starter if you're lacking options.

Jake Locker, QB, Tennessee Titans

The returning Locker looked great against a solid San Francisco pass defense, throwing for 326 yards and two scores (one interception) along with about 30 rushing yards against the 49ers. That comes after Locker had two solid games prior to his injury, and the Titans don't face a passing D as good as San Fran the rest of the fantasy season. All that leads me to believe he can be a solid backup the rest of the year and a potential starter if your regular No. 1 goes down or has a particularly tough matchup.

If you're desperate

Delanie Walker, TE, Tennessee Titans


While we're talking Tennessee, Walker has received a good number of looks from Locker and may benefit from his return. He's a low-ceiling add, but if you are in need of a bye week fill-in or are disappointed with your starter's production, he may be the best available.

Dexter McCluster, WR, Kansas City Chiefs


Aside from last week's 10 targets, McCluster has steadily had five in each of his three other games -- not really enough to warrant starting consideration for a receiver. He and Donnie Avery are the kings of not-quite-enough this year in an offense that ultimately runs too much to make pass-catching options besides Bowe appealing.

Josh Davis is a WFAA.com web editor, formerly covered the Texas Rangers for WFAA.com. and is kinda obsessed with fantasy sports. He has no professional expertise in fantasy sports, but finds it funny that anyone claims they do.

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