Martin Perez focused on rehab

Martin Perez focused on rehab

Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Apr 13, 2014; Arlington, TX, USA; Texas Rangers starting pitcher Martin Perez (33) during the game against the Houston Astros at Globe Life Park in Arlington. The Rangers defeated the Astros 1-0. Mandatory Credit: Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

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by LANDON HAAF

WFAA Sports

Posted on June 4, 2014 at 12:23 PM

Updated Wednesday, Jun 4 at 12:25 PM

It would be tough to go to Six Flags and be forced to only watch other people ride the roller coasters. And it would be unreasonable to go to Del Frisco’s and get the appetizer salad for dinner.

No disrespect, because Del Frisco’s has a mean wedge salad, but not enjoying one of their fine cuts of meat (Porterhouse, medium, if you’re looking for a suggestion) would defeat the purpose of venturing to a high-end steak place for dinner.

But that’s the type of situation Rangers’ lefty Martin Perez is in as the club returned from an 11-game road trip Tuesday. He was at the stadium - a big smile and a thicker beard on his face - but can’t play baseball as he rehabs his throwing elbow after May 19 Tommy John surgery.

“That’s part of the game, that’s how I think of it,” Perez said. “I’m not the first one or the last one to [have it happen]. Just focusing my rehab and come back strong next year.”

Right now, Perez is focused solely on taking care of his arm, he said. He is working on slowly regaining movement in the elbow and doing exercises with five-pound weights.

Perez plans to stay in Texas for his rehab process. He will go to Arizona when it’s time for him to face hitters, but that stage of recovery is several months away.

Until then, his impact will be from the dugout.

“My season is over but I still want to support my teammates,” Perez said. “I just want to go talk outside, because we need to win. That’s why I come here, to be with my teammates and talk with my teammates.”

As far as the ever-increasing frequency of the infamous Tommy John surgery needed to repair the UCL ligaments in so many young pitchers’ arms, it’s just a part of the game.

“Maybe we throw a lot before, or now, I don’t know,” Perez said. “That’s baseball. It’s a consequence of working hard and liking to compete.”

The standard recovery time for Tommy John surgery is 12 to 18 months. Perez hopes to be “ready to rock and roll” for a majority of the 2015 season.

Luckily for him, he can afford a few Porterhouses AND the wedge salad between now and the next time he toes the rubber.

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