More widespread rainfall across Houston area

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KHOU

Posted on July 15, 2012 at 2:01 PM

Updated Sunday, Jul 15 at 2:02 PM

HOUSTON — After a brief lull in the rainfall on Saturday night, storms returned on Sunday across several counties.

By just after noon, storms were moving northeast at 15 mph and dropping about 1"-1.5" of rain per hour. Flash flooding on roadways and low water crossings are very likely for the next few hours.

Heavy rain that began on Thursday had barely let up by Sunday, hitting the already saturated ground and causing flooding in many parts of the Greater Houston area.

A flood warning is in effect until 10 p.m. on Tuesday for Harris County and 4 a.m. Tuesday for Montgomery and Brazoria Counties. A flood warning is also in effect for Calhoun County until 8 a.m. Monday and Liberty County until 4 p.m. Monday. 

The widespread storms affecting Houston since Monday have brought more rainfall to Harris County than the first 200 days of 2011, bringing more than a foot of water to some areas.

Many residents were packing up and moving out the Spring Creek area Friday night.  

In northwest Harris County, a good portion of the subdivision called the Enchanted Valley Estates was only accessible by boat. Homeowners could be seen using canoes, pontoon boats and even a jet ski to navigate around the area.

Firefighters rescued several families from the Norchester subdivision near Cypress Creek Friday when two to three feet of water seeped into their homes overnight.

Several people had to be rescued early Friday morning after driving into high water.

Officials with the Harris County Office of Emergency Management said anyone who encounters high water on a road should turn around. The majority of flooding deaths involve people in vehicles.

“If you find your home surrounded by water, the best thing to do is to let that water subside before you even try to go out there,” Francisco Sanchez with the Harris Count OEM said.

What’s more, floodwater is often full of sewage, fire ants and snakes, so officials advise against walking or playing in it.

Click here for a list of creeks and bayous we’re keeping an eye on.

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