Texas cancer surgeon accused of spying on ex-wife with popular software

Texas cancer surgeon accused of spying on ex-wife with popular software

A pioneer in cancer research is facing a second degree felony charge in an alleged plot to spy on his ex-wife while they were going through their divorce. According to prosecutors, Dr. Steven Curley plotted with a computer expert to install a program called eBlaster.

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by DREW KAREDES

KHOU 11 News Houston

Posted on January 8, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Updated Wednesday, Jan 8 at 11:41 AM

HOUSTON -- A pioneer in cancer research is facing a second degree felony charge in an alleged plot to spy on his ex-wife while they were going through their divorce.

According to prosecutors, Dr. Steven Curley plotted with a computer expert to install a program called eBlaster.

Dr. Curley and his ex, a physician’s assistant, once worked together at MD Anderson Hospital.

Curley’s attorney believes a bitter divorce is behind the accusations.

“I think when the facts are revealed about the motivations of why this has come to light, he’ll be vindicated,” explained attorney Robert Scardino.

Curley and his alleged accomplice, Hank Lehmann, face a charge of unlawful intercept. The charge comes attached with up to 20 years in prison if convicted.

MD Anderson told WFAA sister station KHOU that Dr. Curley retired from the hospital at the end of 2013.

“He’s very concerned that something like this could have an adverse affect on his career. It’s certainly a distraction from what he does,” added Scardino.

The program the two are accused of using is quite popular. Spy Emporium in Montrose said eBlaster is almost sold out, and people are waiting to buy more.

“Anything that’s done online, any activity on a computer, it can capture and be sent to your email remotely,” said Sidney May with Spy Emporium.

The software, which costs about $100, captures keystrokes and can steal passwords and email texts. May said it is “virtually undetectable.”

“We have customers that come back and buy multiple copies because they want to spy on the laptop and the desktop,” said May.

This case is set to go to court on Jan. 22.

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