Update: Reaction to Uncut commentary on 'Wylie's Angel'

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by JOHN MCCAA

Bio | Email | Follow: @johnmccaa

WFAA

Posted on May 2, 2010 at 6:20 PM

Here’s an updated list of the people who have responded to Friday's Uncut commentary on Gerren Isgrigg.

Among those we have heard from are the parents in the “choosing Thomas” story that was quoted in the commentary. They wrote with some heartwarming news:


We are the parents of Thomas Laux, Deidrea & TK.  We saw your commentary on "Wylie's Angel" and want to thank you for your kind words about our family.  We have been heart broken over Gerran's tragic death and it was a reminder of how precious each life is.    Thank you for remembering our son, he continues to be such a blessing to us especially now as we celebrate 4 months with our beautiful healthy daughter, Isabella Mae.   

- Blessings, Deidrea & TK Laux


Thank you for your news piece on little Gerren Isgrigg and your invitation for viewers to share thoughts. I want to expand on something you said: "It makes no sense to try the case in the media. Instead, we should concentrate on the families for whom every life does matter, for whom being born into the fold - no matter what your difficulties - means not walking away, but standing strong." I completely agree.  I see the shrine on tv with all the toys and flowers and it makes no sense to me.  Instead, why not find a family who has a child with a disability and offer them whatever assistance you can?   Here is a list of ideas:  

  • Take care of the child for an hour or two and let the caregiver have some much needed time to themselves.
  • Take care of the child while the caregiver runs an errand.
  • Hang out with the child in their home and allow the caregiver to do things around the house, uninterrupted.
  • Take the child for a walk around the neighborhood.
  • Offer to clean the house once or give the family a gift certificate for a one-time housekeeping service.
  • Take a meal over to the family and give the caregiver/cook a night off. -Get to know the family and visit them often, so they don't feel isolated.
  • Volunteer at The Arc, Easter Seals, or Downs Syndrome Alliance for childcare during their parent information conferences.  

I am the mother of a child with disabilities and any of these things would mean alot to me.  I can't help but wonder if someone had offered these things to Gerren's grandmother, if the outcome would have been vastly different for him. 

- Wanda


I REALLY like what you had to say about Wylie's Angel tonight!!

- Kenneth


These are some of my questions:  

Was the child diagnosed with West syndrome by a doctor in a military hospital?   If so, would a military health facility provide services for West syndrome to the child of an enlisted military man or woman?   If that is the case, does the military require that a divorced person have custody of the child?   These three questions lead to my wondering why the mom and dad didn't check on that.  In addition, I would want to know who filed for the divorce, what judge signed for it, and why did he or she not establish the best possible needs for the child.

- PV


Thank you for your commentary on the 6 p.m. broadcast.  You offered a prophetic perspective about what parenting and love really mean with an excellent comparison in the other family’s story.   I’m in a mighty struggle with myself not to be unfairly judgmental toward the Gerren’s dad.  Quite frankly, I could hardly stomach listening to the Marine father who is finally on the scene so he could “hold his little boy’s hand” while doing that “hardest thing he’s ever done.”  I know I/we only have bits and pieces of the story so far.  But as a father who has lost a child and as a retired military man, I can’t imagine why this guy had not seen his son in three years!  Even if he had spent two tours in Iraq or Afghanistan, he would have had time to visit his boy if he really cared.  Even if the mother had sole custody, he likely could have had a visit or two unless there were a restraining order against him.  Would someone ask him where the hell he’s been?  Did he pay child support?  Did he send birthday cards?  Did he send anything at Christmas?   I’m not interested in hearing anything else from him, especially the sentimental drivel, unless a reporter asks him to “fill in the blanks!”   What the grandmother did is beyond imagination.  But I’m sorry she’s the easy target as the negligent family member when the mother (where is she even now?) and the father are the persons primarily responsible for little Gerren’s life and death.

- Dennis        


Thank you for your upfront story about the families who take care of terminally ill children Having a child with severe special needs is not a curse, in our case it has been a long-term blessing.  Have no doubt that over the years we've had many frustration with doctors, schools, agencies and the like.    However, everyone who has ever met  _____ ... loves _______.  He has had a quality of life due to our persistant love, acceptance and patience.  Our church helps, our family helps and our agencies help.   People who are close to special needs children only benefit by having fuller lives.  Thank you for your story that there are many, many caring folks out there.  Even foster care families, who take on children and adults who have no one.

- Robin


Yes, we loved your observations on Choosing Thomas

- Janet & Mike


I saw the interview of the father on the news tonight.  Oh Yes, he is overwhelmed by how much the Wylie community has reached out for this innocent child.  The father is as guilty as the mother and grandmother in this case!  He has not seen his son in three years! He hasn’t had to bother with his son the past three plus years and is now overwhelmed with the responsibility of having to deal with his son’s tragic life and now death. Let’s see if the father has the guts to give this innocent child a proper burial!  I’m sorry, I’m not buying the fathers story either! 

- Connie


 

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