How polling stations protect against rigged elections

Election Security

Election officials in Collin County say there are safeguards in place to prevent a "rigged" election. Collin County Elections Administrator Bruce Sherbet says it's a matter he and his team take very seriously.

"Well we have vetted and tested machines and the people working are a bi-partisan board," Sherbet said.

On Tuesday, Sherbet responded to questions about "rigged" elections after GOP nominee Donald Trump suggested the outcome wouldn't be fair.

"Well I've never seen a rigged election and I've covered seven presidential elections. There are so many safeguards in place," Sherbet said.

Neal Katz is a part of one of those safeguards. Katz is the director of the Collin County GOP and oversees the ballot board in Collin County, a bi-partisan group that audits election results.

"The machines are sealed three times,” he said. “If the seal is tampered with it turns a different color and we'll know.”

While Katz said he believes in the integrity of the American election, he said there are cases of voter fraud across the country that make voters wary.

"I think it's good to have questions," Katz said.

Among the safeguards in Collin County are certified machines that are tested and sealed each night, trained election workers from all major parties, voter registration logs that are checked to make sure people aren't voting at multiple sites and the ballot board comprised of 15 republicans, 15 democrats and, for the first time this election, four libertarians.

"If there was some kind of hacking or tampering it would require a major conspiracy and people from all over because the election system is decentralized," Sherbet said.

Because each district has it's own set of rules and it's own program, Sherbet said there would have to be calculated and coordinated tampering across the country at polling places, a task very difficult to achieve without detection. While Sherbet said he has complete faith in the election system, he said he welcomes questions from voters.

"It's a chance for them to learn more about the process and their concerns should be taken seriously," Sherbet said.

Sherbet said voters can participate by becoming poll watchers. For information on how to do that, click here.

Copyright 2016 WFAA


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