Castro brothers on 2016, FBI investigation, their political futures

U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro and Congressman Joaquin Castro from San Antonio join Jason Whitely and Bud Kennedy.

DALLAS - Despite overnight tracking polls showing Hillary Clinton taking a hit for news about the FBI renewing its investigation into her use of a private email server, Congressman Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, and his identical twin brother, Julian, said they don’t think the issue will matter much to voters as they go to the polls.

“In the end I don’t think it will be a setback. I believe that Secretary Clinton will win this election in November. But I do think [FBI] Director [James] Comey showed very poor judgment dropping this 11-days before the election,” said the congressman on WFAA’s Inside Texas Politics Sunday morning.

Julian Castro, the U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development who appeared on the program in his personal capacity and unrelated to any official business, said he didn’t think the investigation would affect voter turnout.

“I don’t believe so. I believe anyone that was impacted by this email story, that was already factored in,” he said.

“People are going to come out and vote. The numbers look good coming out of battleground states.”

In 2008 and 2012, John McCain and Mitt Romney won Texas by double digits.

The Castros were asked what Democrats would consider a win in this state after at least six polls show Trump only leading Clinton by single digits.

“I believe there is an outside chance that Texas goes blue,” said Julian. “I think it would be a win if Democrats get significantly closer than in 2008 and 2012. Yeah, if we get into single digits.”

“Also, you’ve got to remember that every time someone goes out to vote that hasn’t voted before, that’s a victory because more and more of those folks are Democrats.”

Many people tie the future of the Texas Democratic Party to the political prospects of both brothers.

Julian, who is out of a job in January when President Obama leaves office, was asked whether he’s done with politics.

“I don’t know. For the first time in a long time I’m not sure what I’m going to be doing a year from now,” said Julian.

At the state Democratic convention this summer, Julian was asked whether he would consider running for governor in 2018.

“I probably mentioned it to say it’s extremely unlikely I’m going to run for governor in 2018,” said Julian. “Nothing has changed. It’s still extremely – you never want to say never – but very unlikely.”

The congressman is considering whether to run for U.S. Senate against Ted Cruz.

“I’ll take a look at that by the end of this election. I’ll probably make a decision by the end of spring next year,” said Congressman Castro.

Copyright 2016 WFAA


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