Uncut: Nerve gas attack leaves no room for politics

It would seem a simple vote: International condemnation of that Sarin gas attack in Syria. You've seen the pictures. Clearly the attack was unjustifiable.

It would seem a simple vote: International condemnation of that Sarin gas attack in Syria. You’ve seen the pictures. Clearly the attack was unjustifiable.

We've always had war. Somewhere. This was entirely different. Or so we thought.

Syria and Russia insist the rebels fighting the ruling regime did it. More likely, the Syrian Air Force dropped chemical munitions, munitions they claim to have destroyed.

UN condemnation of the attack would've been a step toward proving who was right. So, the United States, France and Great Britain sponsored a resolution to that effect in the 15-member Security Council. Seven other members joined them in condemning the act. Three others, China, Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, abstained. Russia and Bolivia said no.

Russia, which earlier demanded the UN look into the entire affair and the American missile response, used its veto power to block the vote and thus shield the Assad regime.

Politics has its place, but not in this.

The pain inflicted on those retching victims, dying children, should yield no ground to politics. And yet the simple vote to condemn failed.

Syria’s President Assad now calls it all a hoax, which really means Syrian civilians are just as likely to be gassed tomorrow as a week ago.

Certainly in the past, we Americans have backed regimes and rebels we regret. Not this time.

Now is the time for Russia to make a tough decision between supporting a dying regime or defending dying children.

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