Bees take up residence at Fort Worth hotel

Hotel bees

Credit: WFAA

A swarm of bees has taken up residence at a hotel in northwest Fort Worth.

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by BAILEY McGOWAN

WFAA

Posted on March 27, 2013 at 10:24 PM

Updated Wednesday, Mar 27 at 10:24 PM

Hotel bees

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FORT WORTH — Guests at the Budget Suites of America on of Northeast Loop 820 found a swarm of bees outside their hotel rooms Wednesday.

Randy Owens and his girlfriend Christina Perry said they saw the dark cloud of insects just after noon.

"Something I've never seen before," Perry said. "A big swarm. A cloud of bees just right in front of the window."

The bees then found a place to hang out. 

"I went outside and I was watching them and they congregated over at this column," Owens said.

Owens called the hotel’s management to try to take care of the problem, but didn't get a clear answer. Owens said he put up caution tape around where the bees landed, but was told he had to take it down.

"I called management and got no response," Owens said. "Zero response."

Perry said a manager told her he had called a bee keeper, but that she had not seen anyone come out to try and take care of the problem.

"So far, their response has been inadequate, in my opinion," Perry said. "Our main concern was the kids, because there are so many little kids around here."

Christine Garcia owns Bee Charmer, a company that specializes in honey bee removal. She said it is earlier than usual for bee-swarming season. 

"We've had a warm winter, and so we are having an early spring somewhat, flowers are blooming," she said.

In Houston, a woman woke up Saturday morning and found a swarm of bees under her truck. An estimated 8,000 bees covered one of the vehicle’s tires.

"We are seeing more activity with honey bees at this time," Garcia said.

Around late March to early May, a hive will kick out the old queen bee with around half of the hive, Garcia said. The 2,000-5,000 bees that go with her will look for a new home within three to four days.

The swarm will send out scout bees to find a new home. Once a site is selected, the bees -- including the queen -- will make their move. When, the queen lands, the bees will protect her, start building their combs and will not go away.

People should not try to spray anything at the bees or to try to approach them, Garcia warned. "Don't do anything. They are pretty docile and they are not going to attack you. Just don't do anything to them."

Channel 8 contacted a manager at Budget Suites of America for comment and did not receive a reply.

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