Dallas County confirms second human case of West Nile in two days

Mosquito control

Credit: WFAA

A truck sprays in Dallas to control the mosquitoes that spread West Nile virus to humans.

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WFAA

Posted on July 31, 2013 at 11:58 AM

Updated Wednesday, Jul 31 at 1:20 PM

DALLAS -- Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) confirmed the second human case of West Nile virus in the county this season Wednesday morning.

The patient lives in ZIP code 75052 in Grand Prairie, and has West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease, the more serious form of the illness. No other identifying information was released.

It was the second confirmed human case in Dallas County this season, following the announcement of the first human case in the county Tuesday. That case was in Richardson.

Grand Prairie will ground spray for mosquitoes the area bound by E. Pioneer Pkwy. on the north, S. Beltline Rd. on the east, Brandon St. and SE 8th St. on the south, and S. Carrier Pkwy. on the west on Thursday and Friday nights between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., weather permitting.

There is also ground spraying in two areas of the City of Dallas Wednesday night between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., weather permitting.

In Southwest Dallas, the area to be sprayed is within an area bounded generally on the north by Davis Street, on the west by Cockrell Hill Road, bounded by Meredith Drive on the south and Westmoreland Road on the east.

In Southeast Dallas, the area to be sprayed is within an area bounded generally on the north by Grady Lane, on the west by Acres Drive, by Zurich Drive on the south and Edgeworth Drive on the east.

Residents in this area are advised to stay indoors, keep pets inside, and cover fish ponds during those times.

There have been two other human cases in North Texas this season, one in Denton County and the other in Tarrant County.

The health department advises residents to drain standing water, use an insect repellent containing the pesticide DEET, and wear long-sleeve shirts and pants outside at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes, the most common carrier of the virus, are most active.

Since there is no specific treatment for the virus, Dr. Christopher Perkins, DCHHS medical director and health authority said “the first line of defense to prevent West Nile virus infection is to avoid getting bitten in the first place.”

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