Interim Dallas police chief terminates five employees

Dallas police officer, 911 operator fired

Dallas interim Chief of Police David Pughes terminated five employees during a hearing Wednesday afternoon.

Interim Chief Pughes held Internal Affairs hearings Wednesday afternoon and fired 3 Dallas police officers and a 911 operator. All of them had been arrested and indicted for crimes.

One of the officers fired was Christopher Hess who was involved in the fatal shooting of a 21-year-old-mother. A grand jury indicted Hess last month for aggravated assault. He was the first Dallas officer indicted in a fatal shooting in more than 40 years.
    
In January, Hess fired into a stolen vehicle shooting and killing 21-year-old Genevive Dawes. Sources say he fired 12 shots.

He claims Dawes was fleeing and feared other officers might be hurt as she was backing up. But sources say no officers were in danger.
 
Hess was stripped of his gun and badge.
    
Another officer, Jason Kimpel, who also fired a shot into the car, has been recommended for termination. Sources he is accused of lying to investigators about the shooting.

Chief Pughes will hear his case at a later date.

Former Dallas police officer of the year, Keith Huber, was fired after he was indicted for bodily injury to a child.
    
Court documents state that in September in Ellis County, he injured a child under the age of 14 by beating the child with a surge protector.
        
Chief Pughes also fired Officer Holly Carter. In October, Lancaster police say Carter was involved in a hit-and-run and did not stop to help the other driver whose car was disabled.

Instead, they say she went to a gas station to check on her vehicle. She later told investigators she thought the car had been following her and that's why she did not stop.

Dallas 911 operator Tony Marzett was fired after he was indicted for aggravated assault. Irving police say Marzett confronted a woman near a Red Box machine and began yelling at her for taking too long to get out of her vehicle.

Police say he shoved the victim to the ground and punched her face causing her to fall back and break her left arm.

All of those fired can appeal their cases to a civil service to try and get their jobs back.


The following explanation for each terminated individual was posted on the Dallas Police Department's Facebook page:

An Internal Affairs investigation concluded that on May 11, 2016, Senior Corporal Keith Huber, #7839, engaged in adverse conduct when he was involved in a disturbance which resulted in a police response by the Midlothian Police Department. The investigation also concluded that on September 22, 2016, Senior Corporal Huber engaged in adverse conduct which resulted in his arrest on December 29, 2016, for Injury to Child with Intent Bodily Injury, Felony 3.  In addition, the investigation concluded that from December 22, 2016, through December 28, 2016, Senior Corporal Huber violated the Administrative Leave Policy. Senior Corporal Huber was terminated for his actions. He was hired in June 2000 and was assigned to the Central Patrol Division.

An Internal Affairs investigation concluded that on September 7, 2016, Police Officer Holly Carter, #10663, was involved in a motor vehicle accident and failed to stop and render aid, or leave information with the other party.  The investigation also concluded that on December 8, 2016, Officer Carter provided written inconsistent, and/or misleading information in an internal statement. Officer Carter was terminated for her actions.  She was hired in September 2013 and was assigned to the Southeast Patrol Division. 

An Internal Affairs investigation concluded that on December 31, 2016, 911 Call Taker Tony Marzett, #104961, engaged in adverse conduct when he physically assaulted an individual causing serious bodily injury.  The investigation also concluded that the disturbance led to his indictment by a Dallas County Grand Jury on April 20, 2017. 

Call Taker Marzett was terminated for his actions.  He was hired in March 2006 and assigned to the Support Services Division. 

An Internal Affairs investigation concluded that on January 18, 2017, Police Officer Christopher Hess, #8887, violated the Department’s Felony Traffic Stop Policy, Use of Deadly Force Policy, and placed a person in greater danger than necessary.  The investigation also concluded that Officer Hess was involved in a police shooting that led to his indictment by a Dallas County Grand Jury on June 23, 2017. Officer Hess was terminated for his actions.  He was hired in August 2006 and was assigned to the Central Patrol Division.  

According to DPD, under civil service rules, these employees have the right to appeal their discipline. 

© 2017 WFAA-TV


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