Jogger in ICU after collision with cyclist on Katy Trail

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by JONATHAN BETZ

WFAA

Posted on October 1, 2010 at 10:37 PM

Updated Saturday, Oct 2 at 4:29 PM

DALLAS - The Katy Trail provides an oasis in the middle of a concrete jungle for runners and bikers. But that peace was broken for one Dallas woman who was seriously injured in a collision with a cyclist while jogging Thursday evening. 

Friends fear the worse for 28-year-old Lauren Huddleston, who remained in intensive care Friday night at Baylor Hospital.

Now, the City of Dallas says it will investigate the accident to decide if changes need to be made to one of the city's most popular trails.

"She's not doing well," said Elizabeth Guffey, a family friend. "He said it would take a very very major miracle for it improve."

The collision with a bicycle while jogging left her with a severe brain injury.

"It makes you sick," Guffey said. "It's really sad, worse than sad. It's devastating."

The collision exposed a long-simmering feud between joggers and bicyclists who share the 3.5-mile trail through Uptown Dallas.

"If there's going to be pedestrians out here, there shouldn't be cyclists," said Rob Lord, a personal trainer.

Lord is one of many now calling for a ban of high-speed cyclists from the trail.

"They need to be on the outskirts of town on a road doing that," he said. "[It] makes no sense to have them brushing by people."

Although there are parallel paths, there are few hard rules about who uses which, and cyclists can average speeds up to 20 mph.

"I always stay all the way to the right because they go super fast sometimes," said Saskia Routs, a jogger. "It's really scary."

Cyclists say distracted joggers share some of the blame. Huddleston was wearing headphones and turned into the path of the cyclist. Supporters insist the trail should remain available for everyone.

"The trail does not have laws," said Robin Baldock, the executive director of Friends of Katy Trail. "It's not like the street where you have to have a certain speed on the trail. We ask people to be mindful of their speed, slow down, but its not like we can cite them for speeding."

Police say the bicyclist will not be charged with any crime. Officers say he didn't break any law.

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