DISD board backs down on tucked-in shirts policy to protect self esteem

Print
Email
|

by CARLA WADE

Bio | Email | Follow: @CarlaNWade

WFAA

Posted on May 10, 2013 at 11:26 PM

DALLAS -- When it comes to dress, a tucked-in shirt is usually considered neat and tidy, but this week, the DISD Board of Trustees backed off of a district dress code policy requiring tucked-in shirts.

They say it's because it could be considered harmful to some students self esteem.

With every shift in styles, whether it be sagging pants or unusual hairdos, school district dress codes have had to keep up with the trends. With a culture that is increasingly more sensitive to bullying, those dress codes are often detailed and specific.

According to parents, it’s for good reason.

“Because that way, people can’t make fun of each other about what they are wearing,” said Ana Zetina, who was waiting to pick up a sibling outside Dallas’ Woodrow Wilson High School on Friday.

During Thursday’s board briefing, the DISD Board of Trustees was asked to review district policy requiring students to wear shirts tucked in.

The board-approved district dress code for students between pre-K and 8th grade reads, “All tops must be worn tucked inside pants, slacks or skirts.” There is similar wording that applies to students through 12th grade.

A school district staff member said after getting input from principals, there was concern that heavier students might feel uncomfortable tucking in their shirts. While one board member didn’t use the term overweight, it was clear what was meant.

“It was brought to my attention that for the students that are healthy, tucking in your shirt shows your healthiness," said Board President Dr. Lew Blackburn. "So for middle school students, it may be a self-esteem issue.”

The sentiment was better expressed by some 15-year-old Woodrow Wilson High School students.

“In all respect,” Ruth Blaker said, “the tucked-in shirt makes the muffin top a little more accentuated.”

“It’s embarrassing for some kids who are heavier-set,” Jake Whitten said.

All of the 14-, 15-, and 16-year-olds News 8 spoke to were thin, and all of them had shirt tails hanging.

Turns out, a tucked-in shirt may not only draw a little more attention to a little extra around the middle, but it also might make any kid stand out in a crowd.

E-mail cwade@wfaa.com

Print
Email
|