Meteorologist Greg Fields explains the rings inside a hail ball

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by GREG FIELDS

WFAA

Posted on June 14, 2012 at 9:56 AM

Updated Thursday, Jun 14 at 10:15 AM

WFAA meteorologist cuts open a piece of hail to explain exactly how it forms. Fields said hail is basically frozen rain drops.

The intensity of a storm, such as the one that hit North Texas Wednesday, creates updrafts, which carries the moisture up into the top of the storm, where it freezes.

When you slice open a piece of hail, you can see rings, much like that of an onion. The hail starts pea-sized. The rings are created each time a piece of hail lowers and then raises back up into the top of the thunderstorm, forming another layer of ice, until it finally falls when it becomes heavy enough.

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