Woman gets threatening call from bogus DEA agent

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by REBECCA LOPEZ

Bio | Email | Follow: @rlopezwfaa

WFAA

Posted on November 14, 2012 at 6:06 PM

Updated Wednesday, Nov 14 at 7:08 PM

DALLAS – A spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Agency is reminding residents never to wire money to a person over the phone who claims to be an agent. 

Someone is calling certain customers who have bought pills off the Internet pretending to be part of the agency. They claim the customers broke the law and there's a warrant out for their arrest, Unless they pay a fine.

It's a scam. 

Melissa Jones, a producer at WFAA for Good Morning Texas, got a call Wednesday morning from a man claiming to be a special agent with the DEA. 

“He said I was very likely going to prison and I needed to cooperate,” Jones said.

About 10 years ago, Jones ordered Phentermine over the Internet. That's one of the drugs more popularly known as Fen-Phen. 

Someone got that information as well as her cell phone number and address. Authorities say companies selling these drugs often sell customer lists to criminal organizations.

“I left the control room, frankly, hysterical,” Jones said.

The man on the phone told her he had a warrant for her arrest for buying drugs online.

 “I was petrified. I didn't respond like a producer,” she said. “I'm used to scams and all that, I didn't respond like a producer."

The man called back an hour after the first phone call. He said, "We are currently conducting an open and on-going investigation in which we need an immediate full statement." 

Then he told her, She could pay a $2,500 fine and all would be forgiven.

DEA Special Agent in Charge, James Capra says the agency would never try and scare anyone into giving them money. 

“If someone gets a phone call from someone claiming to be a DEA agent and that you're in trouble and you need to pay a fine, It's a scam,” he said. “It's an absolute scam."

And one that the DEA has heard about before –– the criminal organizations orchestrating the scam, Capra said, are usually based outside the United States and they make millions off the hoax.

Email rlopez@wfaa.com

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