Suspect accused of killing kids evaded arrest warrant

Children kidnapped

Credit: WFAA

Police apprehended suspect Naim Rasool Muhammad in a creek near the parked car where his children were found dead.

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by DAVID SCHECHTER

Bio | Email | Follow: @davidschechter

WFAA

Posted on August 23, 2011 at 8:10 PM

Updated Wednesday, Aug 24 at 10:53 AM

Note: Population statistic changed from McKinney to Flower Mound on 8/24. Previous versions used outdated statistics from the 2000 census.

DALLAS - Before Naim Muhammad allegedly abducted and killed his two young children on Monday, there was a warrant out for his arrest in Dallas County. So why wasn't Muhammad in jail, instead of on the loose and now charged with capital murder?

Well, if you take all the people in Flower Mound and that's how many people have outstanding warrants in Dallas County: 65,000.

But there are just 40 deputies to run them all down.

Until he was arrested Monday for allegedly killing his two sons, Naim Muhammad was one of the 65,000.

"We cannot guess which one is going to decide tomorrow that they're going to do something else, so we try to go after all of them,” said Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez.

Court records show in 2009, Muhammad hit his sister in the head with a hammer and was sentenced to five years' probation. Six months ago, he violated his probation by allegedly hitting the mother of his children.

That triggered an arrest warrant, but deputies never found Muhammad to bring him back to jail.

“We went to several places that he told us that he lived at," Valdez said. "We went to those places.”

Officers started searching for Muhammad by going to his last known address. The folks there said  they hadn't seen him in a while and in fact, he was homeless. But he might be at the Dallas Life Foundation, a shelter for homeless people. Officers said they asked around there, but still they couldn't find him.

The deputy who worked the case told News 8 he kept Muhammad's warrant with him for five weeks in hopes Muhammad could be found.

"As much as was possible was done in this case,” Valdez said.

But what would have happened if officers could have found Muhammad?

Experts say they would have arrested him and brought him back to jail. And in punishment for violating his probation, he would have spent about four weeks behind bars and then been back out on the street.

E-mail dschechter@wfaa.com

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