Salmonella stalls production at Dallas pork rinds plant

Rudolph Foods

Credit: WFAA

Rudolph Foods, a leading manufacturer of pork rinds, has halted production at its Dallas plant after salmonella was discovered.

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by ERIC VALADEZ

WFAA

Posted on August 24, 2012 at 1:25 AM

Updated Friday, Aug 24 at 9:44 AM

Rudolph Foods

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DALLAS — A leading manufacturer of pork rinds has halted production at its West Dallas plant after salmonella was discovered.

In a statement issued Thursday, Rudolph Foods confirmed that salmonella was found on floor areas in the "pre-cook" area of its facility during routine environmental testing for unfavorable agents and bacteria.

Rudolph Foods said no bacteria was found on any product contact surfaces or in any finished products.

The pork rind maker expects to resume full production in one week once a thorough cleaning and retesting are complete.

Rudolph supplies salty snacks to Plano-based Frito-Lay sold under the Baken-Ets label.

In a statement, a Rudolph Foods spokesperson said the company on Wednesday "informed Frito-Lay immediately of their decision to alter their sanitation schedule" and assured Frito-Lay that products produced on their behalf are "completely safe."

Rudolph said it has informed its other customers, as well as an on-site inspector with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, about the situation.

"We know these proactive measures continue to solidify our relationship with our customers and consumers — and reinforce our desire to be your most trusted partner in the snack food industry," said Rudolph spokesman Mark Singleton.

Rudolph's Dallas plant is the snack manufacturer's largest packaging facility, capable of producing 15 million pounds of pork rinds per year. About 65 hourly workers will remain employed during the cleanup process.

Salmonella is a bacterial infection that can lead to diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps for up to three days, though most people recover without treatment. It is the most frequently reported cause of food-borne illness.

E-mail evaladez@wfaa.com

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