Pricey water claims to enhance energy, endurance

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by DEBBIE DENMON / WFAA-TV

wfaa.com

Posted on March 15, 2010 at 11:17 PM

Updated Tuesday, Mar 16 at 12:47 PM

Danielle Georgiou teaches modern dance for a living while working on her doctoral degree.

Sixteen-hour days make this dancer drag her feet, and she claims Evolv Water gives her energy.

"I started to notice I had a lot of energy, enough stamina to get through," Georgiou said. "I had about five to six hour-long rehearsals a day, and after the rehearsal was over, I still had more energy."

Evolv is bottled in Arkansas. It's made of natural spring water, extracts of alfalfa leaves, milk whey protein, and several enzymes like bromelain (found in tropical fruits), papain from papaya and five other enzymes: protease, amylase, lipase, lactase, and cellulase.

Nutritionist Dawn Peoples is leery of Evolv's ingredient list. "You never know the exact amount of the ingredients, so it could definitely be just another hype."

Georgiou has been drinking Evolv for five months, and begs to differ. "I pulled a hamstring a month ago, and it's a detrimental injury for a dancer," she said. "I was drinking the water, and instead of a four-week recovery period, I was teaching and dancing full-time in a week."

So what about the so-called healing ingredient in the water?

"Alfalfa is supposed to help heal, but other vitamins and minerals can give you the same outcome," Peoples said.

Dawn Peoples encourages her clients to rely on a nutritious diet rather than spending nearly $55 for a case of enhanced water.

Deloris Wilson, 65, was a pessimist and got cold feet before trying Evolv. "I thought, 'Yeah, right... another one of those things that are supposed to be a miracle cure.'"

But she testified that drinking the water has made a difference for her. "I no longer have cold feet, cramps, the Charlie horses are gone," She said. "That affected quality of life, because I can sleep."

Wilson will not substitute Evolv in place of her diabetes medicine, even though she feels the water does more to treat poor circulation.

Trey White, the owner of the company, makes no medical claims about Evolv. "We don't prevent, treat or cure," he said.

Evolv is not approved by the FDA, but White says a human trial is starting, and hopes to validate the following claim: "If cells are operating in a normal state, properly hydrated, properly oxygenated and free of inflammation, they are the best defense against health challenges and this product assists in that process."

Dawn Peoples, the nutritionist, offers this alternative: "You could take a multivitamin for about 22 cents a day — that will do the same thing for you," she said.

Nevertheless, Danielle Georgiou and Deloris Wilson, thirsty for good health, say they will continue to get the $55 case of water delivered to their door — even though there are no guarantees.

E-mail ddenmon@wfaa.com

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