From struggles with dyslexia to selling a home to the Bushes

Top Dallas realtor shares a personal secret

Allie Beth Allman.

You probably recognize the name. Her name is on signs all over North Texas, but what you don’t know is her personal secret. It's one that has her teaming up with the Barbara Bush Foundation for Literacy.

"I’ll flip through and if there is something about a client, a former client, or potential client I will cut that," said Pierce Allman during a morning debrief.

Allman reads to his wife, Allie Beth, for good reason.

"He knows what I can’t do but he doesn’t dwell on it," Allie Beth said.

You see, Allie Beth is dyslexic — a struggling reader and writer.

"I spell it so wrong that spell check doesn’t make it right," she said.

She can’t hear the sounds, comprehension is tough and she reverses letters. But she doesn’t dwell on excuses. She’s far too motivated.

"I knew I couldn’t be number one at reading so I thought I’ll be number one at everything else," Allie Beth said.

Her first home sale was to a friend, Tom Landry.

"I sold it during the Washington Red Skins; they lost, I won," she said. "He came home and I had two contracts and I didn’t know how to fill out a contract."

Nor did she know how to take a test to get her license. It took three times to pass.

"So when you can’t spell or read it’s hard to pass a test," she said.

That was especially true for college.

"SMU you had to take the ACT test and TCU you didn’t, so I knew I couldn’t pass that test," she said.

So she headed to TCU with roommate and best friend Martha Kay, who would read to her at night. By day, Allie Beth worked with teachers.

"I learned how to be persistent in a nice way," she said. "I was desperate, just desperate."

But her grit paid off.

"You know Allie Beth, I’ve decided your West Texas accent is your charm so I’m going to give you an A-plus, but don’t ever come back," she laughed recalling a story about one of her professors.

"Allie has incredible determination and doesn’t realize something can’t be done," Pierce said.

"I never thought about it," Allie Beth said when asked if she ever thought she would sell a home to the president of the United States. "But I was like, if he’s going to move here, I will."

"The fact that she’s made the biggest sale in Dallas history and Texas residential history is really not surprising," Pierce said. "Because she understand the people."

And those relationships last.

Take this painting gifted to her from President Bush.

"He said to me, 'Do you really want that painting?' I said, 'I want it really bad,'" Allie Beth said of the painting with cacti and a West Texas feel. "... He signed the back with a little note and gave it to me."

The Allmans are now working with the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy, to spread their love for the written word.

"She never forgot where she came from," Pierce said.

"Yes ,it’s all the thorns you go through and growth you go through," said Allie Beth of the Bush painting when asked if it made her feel at home. 

The roots of a West Texas girl, who through it all never stopped believing in herself.

If you would like to learn more about the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy and its upcoming Celebration of Reading Monday on October 24 click here. WFAA's Shelly Slater will emcee on behalf of #ShellysBookworms.

Copyright 2016 WFAA


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