Friday Features: 'The Other Woman' review

Friday Features: 'The Other Woman' review

Credit: Twentieth Century Fox

Director Nick Cassavestes latest chick flick comedy, "The Other Woman," scores one for the female population as it presents a humorous, over-the-top revenge story of multiple women who find out they are dating the same guy.

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by HAYDEN PITTMAN

WFAA Special Contributor

Posted on April 25, 2014 at 12:13 AM

Director Nick Cassavestes latest chick flick comedy, "The Other Woman," scores one for the female population as it presents a humorous, over-the-top revenge story of multiple women who find out they are dating the same guy. Starring Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann, Kate Upton, Nikolaj-Coster-Waldau, Don Johnson, and Taylor Kinney, this film is filled with a series of cheap laughs and female-driven bits that serve to showcase what a woman might experience - mentally and physically - when cheated on. Using clever, funny dialogue and positive performances, "The Other Woman" gives the audience an easy-to-follow, mostly-satisfying experience.

When trouble starts between Carly (Diaz) and her boyfriend, Mark (Coster-Waldau), she attempts to fix the relationship by surprising Mark at his home. After an awkward encounter with Mark’s unexpected wife, Kate (Mann), at their home and a confrontation the next day at Carly’s office, the two realize they are both being cheated on. Taking a closer look at Mark’s day-to-day activities, they soon discover yet another girl, Amber (Upton). The three girls quickly bond over their situation and plan out a revenge that will rock Mark’s world and ultimately destroy him. In the end, Kate must decide whether to end her marriage and move on, proceed with their plan against Mark, or give him another shot.

Without a doubt, this film is geared to a certain audience – females! Be it the young adult or older women who may have experienced something like this themselves, the film heavily relies on female-related stereotypes and loud, vulgar, slapstick humor. Overall, this is a film about how women might think or act, given the situation. There are countless attempts at humor using smart dialogue, real-life comparisons, cultural references, and outrageous behavior. As a result, there are numerous laugh-out-loud moments, especially for women. This doesn’t mean it’s not enjoyable for men; on the contrary, it teaches them to be faithful to women and shows what might happen in an extreme scenario. You’ll also have some fun taking your girlfriend or wife to this one.

One of the most fitting elements of this film is the acting. Leslie Mann is spot on as a mid-life, scatterbrained wife who is somewhat heartbroken and driven borderline insane by her cheating husband. Cameron Diaz plays a strong, sexy, independent, and playful woman still playing the field in her later years. Kate Upton fills the role of a brainless, superficial, busty young blonde. Nikolaj Coster-Waldau fits his role as a cheating, suave playboy, and Taylor Kinney, Don Johnson, and Nicki Minaj round out the supporting cast. There are hit-and-miss moments, but overall the cast does an exceptional job.

Depending on whether you’re a male or female, the characters in this film bounce back and forth between having a great time and having to deal with unexpected emotions, drama, or consequences. From a greedy, selfish male perspective, Mark looks like he’s having the time of his life juggling his wife, multiple girlfriends, and his flashy, high-profile lifestyle. More than once, Kate looks miserable and crazy after finding out about her husband. But when the girls get together and begin to take revenge, the roles are reversed. From getting Ex-Lax and hormones put in his drinks to hair removal in his shampoo, Mark looks to be miserable. All the while, the girls have a wild time spying on him, fighting with each other, drinking together, and bonding while scheming.

The film does not present much depth or life lessons. If anything, it stresses the importance of being faithful, depicts the extraordinary results of cheating, and reminds men and women to watch their back. It does exhibit how a woman might react under severe circumstances, partially demeaning women by showing how crazy they might get, but ultimately creates a satisfying ending as the cheater clearly gets what he deserves. It could be said that this film cheapens the idea of cheating and the associated consequences by turning it into an exaggerated mockery. "The Other Woman" doesn’t absolutely knock it out of the park, but for all of the male-driven movies that are made, it’s refreshing to see a male director create something worth seeing for an adventurous or good-humored woman. Bottom line -- don’t cheat!

Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars.


"The Other Woman" is rated PG-13 on appeal for mature thematic material, sexual references, and language. Running time is 1 hour and 49 minutes.


Hayden Pittman is a special contributor to WFAA.com and a freelance film critic and entertainment blogger out of Dallas. More of his content can be found on YouPlusDallas.com and his author archive here. For more of his reviews on WFAA, click here. He is a film, TV, and sports enthusiast, and when not writing reviews or covering an event, he works in film production. As an average, passionate film lover who rarely misses a film, his reviews are straightforward and his way with words will let you know in a simple way what he thinks. Don’t like what he has to say? Let him know at haydenp@youplusmedia.com or follow him on Twitter at @HPMoviePitt.

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